Ed Hineline Jr: Blog https://www.edhineline.com/blog en-us (C) Ed Hineline Jr (Ed Hineline Jr) Thu, 28 Apr 2022 20:51:00 GMT Thu, 28 Apr 2022 20:51:00 GMT https://www.edhineline.com/img/s/v-12/u456418919-o975929409-50.jpg Ed Hineline Jr: Blog https://www.edhineline.com/blog 66 120 My Grandson's 1st Baseball Tryouts https://www.edhineline.com/blog/2015/2/1st-baseball-tryouts Throwing 'em OutThrowing 'em OutMaddox 1st Baseball Tryouts 02-22-2015 The day before his tryouts, I found myself sitting on my truck tailgate with my seven year old grandson talking about how much fun his first baseball tryouts were going to be.  With his bat in hand, he jumped up and onto the truck bed lid and said "let me show you how my knuckles line up" and he started his practice swings.  What a great memory for me store away, at the same time remembering the past excitement of my son's and daughter's baseball and softball practices, games, and conversations of future expectations.  Here I go again, camera in hand.  It doesn't get any better than this.

I was so excited that once again I was going to a tryout for little ones.  I made sure the night before that my backpack was ready with clean camera lenses, that there was plenty of digital card memory, and all batteries were fully charged.  My alarm clock went off at 6:00AM and I was ready to go.  I didn't want to miss photographing a single swing of the bat, or scoop and throw.  When I arrived at the field, I heard this resounding voice call out "PAPA" from beyond the fence.  What a great feeling it was to hear the little guy call me and meet at the fence with a quick handshake and fist pump with explosion.  I could imagine his nervousness since I began remembering when I was a titch older than him when I had my first tryouts and I was very nervous.  I also remember how important it was to see my mom and dad as well as my grandparents sitting in the stands when I had a game.  ScoopScoopMaddox 1st Baseball Tryouts 02-22-2015 I quickly scanned the bleachers and saw a whole host of proud parents envisioning their little "Casey" at bat hitting a home run and "touching 'em all" to cheers of the crowd.  My observation though was missing a very important aspect, I didn't see any cameras.  I was the only one capturing this pivotal moment in these young children's lives.  This was one moment in time that I was not going to miss.

I affixed my 70-300mm lens to the camera and worked my way to a stealth position so I wouldn't interfere with the activities but appear and disappear randomly so he knew I was supporting his efforts.  I was so proud to be able to capture images of him in traditional baseball pants and practice shirt all topped off with his Angry Birds baseball cap to intimidate the competition.  I set my camera on high speed continuous shooting so that I would capture as many frames of the action as possible.  Another import aspect of capturing this event was to get the all important pictures with his Mom, Dad, Mema, and Aunt.  Everyone needed to be part of this documented event to tell the whole story of his first baseball tryout.

What a great morning and he did fantastic! I truly enjoyed photographing this event and I encourage everyone to bring your camera and capture every event moment of your family.  Whether it's the first baseball tryout, ballet recital, school play, or some other type of event, going back and revisiting is very important in a persons life.  Don't miss out, enjoy and always remember,

"Moments in time are lived once. Images of those moments live forever."

Have you had a similar experience, I'd like to hear about it.

Ed H.

 

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(Ed Hineline Jr) activity baseball camera ed hineline fun hineline photography sports tryout https://www.edhineline.com/blog/2015/2/1st-baseball-tryouts Mon, 23 Feb 2015 02:11:30 GMT
Pass It On https://www.edhineline.com/blog/2015/2/PassItOn  

Pass It On

"Pass It On"
My Social Experiment
Did You Receive a Card?

"Pass It On" is my social experiment to see how many people can be made to feel special by simply giving them one of my photographs on a "You are Special!!!" business size card and providing them a choice to either "Keep It" or "Pass it On".  There is no cost; no advertising; no strings attached.  There are no expectations to buy or sell anything.  "Pass It On" is simply a set of printed cards handed out to produce a smile or to say thank you for being a special person.  The cards were given to people because of an observed random act of kindness; or a passing smile or hello; or a feeling that someone needed a pick-me-up; or for no other reason except that today is a great day and our paths crossed, potentially never to cross again.

If you received a card you have a choice:

  • "Keep" the card and smile each time you see it, because the person "Passing It On" thought you were special, or
  • "Pass It On" to someone else to make them smile and feel special.  Initial the back of the card to show you are part of the greater good in making people feel happy.  Use your camera and snap a picture of the front and back so you have a remembrance of your actions.

If you would like to share your experience, add your comments below and include the number that was written on the card.   I'm looking for positive feedback that the cards may have had on you or the person you gave the card.

I am hoping this experiment will provide many comments that show the genuine good nature everyone posses.

Enjoy and remember,

"Moments in time are lived once. Images of those moments live forever."

Ed H.

 

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(Ed Hineline Jr) Pass It On blog color colorful experiment feel good flower flowers hineline image nature photo photography smile social https://www.edhineline.com/blog/2015/2/PassItOn Mon, 16 Feb 2015 01:31:43 GMT
My "Selfies" - A Photographer In Front Of and Behind The Lens https://www.edhineline.com/blog/2015/2/my-selfies In the past the only way I was able to get into a picture was to place my camera on a tripod, table, or boxes, set the timer and run like hell.  Everyone waited for the flashing light to count down for the eventual clicking sound of the shutter.  The number of shots taken was dependent upon how fast I could get into my position usually with the first few shots of my backside, or a profile, or just some dumb look because I was not completely ready.  I know this process was happening everywhere, family members or friends standing huddled together and then given the command to smile and wait for the click.  Bodies and faces frozen for at least ten seconds waiting for the click and flash.  It can be hysterical watching everyone trying to freeze a happy expression, only to complain about why the picture only got the back of my head when I pushed the button and couldn't get my chubby legs moving fast enough.

Cell phones have helped people come out from behind the lens with the ability to set the camera to shoot from either a front or rear lens.  The phenomenon of the cell phone "selfie" is so significant to me because those behind the camera, immortalizing the moment in time, are now shown as being part of the activity.  Spontaneity is captured which shows raw emotion and participation.  All of which the photographer was left out in the past unless relinquishing control of the camera or begging someone else to capture the moment, usually not at the same level excitement.

My daughter introduced me to the selfie a few years ago by shooting us with her phone.  I am a good candidate because I have long arms and know that the farther away the camera, the more people can get in the picture.  I've never been a person that wanted to have a picture taken, I've always been more comfortable behind the lens with quick "hit-and-run" conversations with a click of a button.  This concept of a "selfie" has become a new challenge for me.  I decided to capture selfies in situations that are spontaneous, fun for me, and challenging to photograph.  Some of these situations include the use of mirrors, reflections in windows, or my shadow on different types of backgrounds.  My shadow is becoming more interesting lately because the size and shape of the shadow is dependent upon the placement of the sun (high noon vs sunrise/sunset) and an available object that will be of interest that I can cast the shadow.  With all of my selfies I find that symmetry can also be a challenge.  My personal preference is to have symmetry in my images with both arms even or the image centered with straight lines.  Window reflections are also interesting and challenging.  This is because I cannot use a flash and am dependent upon any existing light that can highlight me in the image.

The artistic possibilities of selfies is endless.  Now when walking I'm like Peter Pan, watching and trying to catch my shadow through the camera.  I am watching for my reflection with lighting opportunities.  Selfies are going to be a new adventure where this photographer is going to make the effort to be in front of and behind the lens.

Have you had a similar experience, I'd like to hear about it.

Enjoy and remember,

"Moments in time are lived once. Images of those moments live forever."

Ed H.

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(Ed Hineline Jr) blog camera hineline image journal photo photography reflection selfie https://www.edhineline.com/blog/2015/2/my-selfies Mon, 09 Feb 2015 03:49:44 GMT
Walking: The Six Mile Cypress Slough (sloo), Fort Myers, Florida https://www.edhineline.com/blog/2015/1/six-mile-slough Six Mile Cypress Slough (sloo) PreserveSix Mile Cypress Slough (sloo) PreserveSix Mile Cypress Slough (sloo) Preserve located in Fort Myers, Florida

There is no better way to relieve stress than to take a walk in a nature preserve.  My wife saw that my stress level was reaching it's maximum and suggested we take a trip to the west coast of Florida and visit the Six Mile Cypress Slough (pronounced sloo) in Fort Myers.  I was a little concerned about the perceived six mile walk and the South Florida heat, but the reality is that it was only 1.4 miles and a well sun insulated walkway. To my pleasant surprise I discovered this was a very mature preserve with a beautiful canopy of vegetation Six Mile Cypress Slough (sloo) PreserveSix Mile Cypress Slough (sloo) PreserveSix Mile Cypress Slough (sloo) Preserve located in Fort Myers, Florida providing a nice roof-like covering for the wooden walkway.  The canopy provided all types of challenging lighting opportunities with brilliant colors and reflection opportunities at every turn.

When I start walking, my focus is not about looking for any particular birds, flowers, or nature items.  I focus on seeing everything and allow myself to relax and experience the walk.  To my amazement when I follow this approach, I always just begin to see things.  I don't make much noise.  I walk softly in the hopes that I am blending in with nature as opposed to being a foreign object invading the environment.  I find myself avoiding others on the walkways.  I will generally find a cool spot in the shade where I can observe the movement of leaves, branches, and most importantly water.  Still water presents reflection opportunities.  Rippled water presents fish, turtles, or alligators that blend silently and seamlessly into the colors.  As I walked "through the slough" all the stresses that life has presented me quickly evaporates from my mind and soul.  This level of consciousness allows me to see the ripples.  I start to observe birds camouflaged within the tree leaves while sounds of movement become more prominent.  My camera now becomes my weapon for the hunt.  "Capturing" in my camera prison what I see and being able to tell the story of my surroundings through pictures becomes the goal of the hunt.  Ultimately I want the viewer of my images to feel as if they were walking in my shoes.

The Six Mile Slough was a great photography opportunity that I am grateful to have been able to take advantage.  I look forward to returning and walking "through the slough" in the spring and once again use the preserve as an opportunity to reduce life's stresses.

Have you had a similar experience, I'd like to hear about it.

Enjoy and remember,

"Moments in time are lived once. Images of those moments live forever."

Ed H.

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(Ed Hineline Jr) aligator birds camera image journal nature photography reflection sloo slough https://www.edhineline.com/blog/2015/1/six-mile-slough Fri, 23 Jan 2015 04:51:35 GMT
Preserving the Christmas Tree Ornaments- Timber https://www.edhineline.com/blog/2014/12/the-christmas-tree-timber The Christmas TreeThe Christmas TreeThe Christmas Tree TIMBERRRR... That's the sound you would expect to hear in the woods as opposed to hearing this echo off the walls in your living room.  Many holiday families that purchased or cut down a large live Christmas Tree has lived with the devastation of their tree and years of memories crash to the ground.  My family experienced the joyful feeling of visiting the Christmas Tree stand, ripping open multiple tightly wrapped trees all to find the perfect northern specimen for Santa to leave gifts under, only to hear the cracking of wood and the shrill sound of glass smashing on the floor.  Tears begin to flow as reminiscent stories are told of each broken memory.  This only happens once, because when that first tree falls the next step after cleaning up the memories is to anchor the monster to the wall or ceiling. You pray the string is strong enough to lasso an elephant and is transparent to everyone admiring your decorating expertise.  The holidays do survive.

_MG_7251_MG_7251Hineline Family Christmas 2014 This year my ladies once again convinced me to pop the Advil and throw a ten foot behemoth into the back of the truck.  After we strung the lights, set the ornaments, tossed the tinsel, and carefully set the Angel on it's perch overseeing our home, that familiar "crack" was heard.  We were within a few moments of pure ruination of our holidays.  It was time to get the string and wall anchors and save the day.

As I verified the anchors I began to look closely at the near disaster and realized that if this tree fell, our memories would once again be compromised and I needed to use my camera to document the years.  This turned into a perfect situation to photograph our ornaments in an environment that is only available for a few weeks a year.  Typically our ornaments are carefully packed and stored in the attic.  I was witnessing the natural habitat of our ornamental memories where the colorful bright holiday lights brought the hibernating ceramic figurines to life. 

 

Photographing the ornaments turned an impromptu point & shoot opportunity into a very satisfying family project.  We can now enjoy these pieces of art anytime from this point forward.  I can also share our memories with others.  I feel a sense of security in shooting the images because tragedy can happen at any time where these beautiful pieces of art can be destroyed.  Glue can only help for a short amount of time.  Do you love photography?  Now is the perfect opportunity to shoot images that are only available during this time of year.  Give it a try, shooting these type of images can be challenging.  I shot all these images on manual with an ISO of 200, shutter speed 125, and an aperture of 8.0.  In addition I used my Speedlite 580EX II set on ETTL with the flash exposure set from -1 to -3 depending upon the reflectiveness of the object.

Have you had a similar experience, I'd like to hear about it.

Enjoy and remember,

"Moments in time are lived once. Images of those moments live forever."

Ed H.

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(Ed Hineline Jr) Christmas holiday image ornament ornaments photo photography spirit tree https://www.edhineline.com/blog/2014/12/the-christmas-tree-timber Thu, 18 Dec 2014 04:59:03 GMT
My Cell Phone Photography https://www.edhineline.com/blog/2014/8/cell-phone-photography I've always viewed myself as a traditional photographer, shooting with either my 35mm film camera or my current Digital SLR.  About six months ago I finally upgraded my "beam me up Scotty" flip style phone to a Samsung Galaxy S4, and I'm having a lot of fun using the camera feature and sharing the images I shoot. 

Last night my wife and I took our six year old grandson to Monster Mini Golf to have some fun and then grab a quick bite to eat at Tijuana Flats, both in Miramar, Florida.   This was one of those situations where carrying my Canon 7D was not going to be very convenient.  I had never been to this game room and was not sure what to expect, except to just have a good time and play some games.  When I walked into this indoor miniature golf course I discovered an environment primed for terrific family pictures as well as artistic photography opportunities.  With cell phone camera poised and ready in my pocket, I felt like a old west gunslinger strolling through the isles reaching for my thirteen megapixel weapon and shooting with hopes of pinpoint accuracy. 

Cell phone photography was never on my radar, but I have learned that people pursue the art of photography for many reasons, some for financial gain, some for hobby purposes, some for pure artistic pleasures, and some for the capture of lifetime memories, thus my photography motto,"Moments in time are lived once. Images of those moments live forever."  My cell phone camera is opening a new world for me.  I started with the standard camera application that came with my Galaxy, just called "Camera", and recently purchased ProCapture 1.7 (old version).  I tried the free version, along with others, and I liked the ease of the interface.  I upgraded from the free version because I wanted to utilize the maximum thirteen megapixels that my phone would support.  I feel that if I'm going to take pictures, I want the best possible digital image, just in case I get something good and want a print.  As I shoot and review my cell phone photos, I almost feel a sense of nostalgia.  The images remind me of pictures I would see from my youth.  Pictures which tended to be a little grainy, a little bit out of focus, images being caught in the moment.  When I shoot with my phone, my goal is not to use the flash.  I like the way the existing light looks with the camera manipulating the white balance.  I'll make some minor improvements during post production but for the most part I leave the images alone.  I'll also try not to use the flash because I'm not pleased with the dreaded "red eye" that shows because the flash angle is to close to the lens.  Whether I am using my Digital SLR or my cell phone camera, I am still looking for opportunities for composition.  The miniature golf course had many of these opportunities, with the florescent lights that made the painted wall images look 3-D.  Family "selfies" are an interesting concept also.  I can now be in the event pictures which never included me because I was on the wrong side of the camera.  How cool is that!!!

I am going to keep experimenting with my cell phone, especially since the quality is getting better.  The quick shots are a great and easy way for me to capture memories while also helping me maintain the sense of perfectionism I try to achieve in my photography.

Have you had a similar experience, I'd like to hear about it.

Enjoy and remember,

"Moments in time are lived once. Images of those moments live forever."

Ed H.
 

 

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(Ed Hineline Jr) blog camera cell phone camera cell phone photography image photography https://www.edhineline.com/blog/2014/8/cell-phone-photography Sat, 16 Aug 2014 20:58:57 GMT
Nikki Dog - Farewell to the "Mutt" https://www.edhineline.com/blog/2014/8/nikki-dog Nikki Today was a sad day for this photographer, a day long known to come.  The family dog, affectionately known as Nikki, or "You Little Shit", or "Hey Baby", or "That Damn Dog", or just "Mutt" was peacefully put down today.  It broke my heart!

About sixteen years ago, to my dismay, my wife and I picked out this pure white Peek-a-Poo puppy for our daughter's birthday, which came with all the promises of walking, feeding, and bathing.  After the first few days the "Mutt" became mine to, you guessed it,  walk, feed, bathe, take to the vet, and in general keep happy.  Even though she was the family dog, the "Mutt" was very much a part of me.  She was excitable, neurotic, yappy with high shrill bark, fearless against bigger dogs, and extremely loyal to her family.  I did not realize the effect this little bundle of energy would have on me as I counted down the days to her final veterinary appointment.  As the "Mutt" became older, she became more obnoxious, more demanding, more of everything that earned her the special names we used to call her.  But in the end all of those age related misgivings seemed to be forgotten and all the memories of the special times came flooding back into the present moment.  Memories of her escaping from the house, only to play the game of "catch me if you can" with me chasing her up and down the street on roller blades.   The result ended with me landing the neighbors bushes with the "Mutt" running home straight for the front door.  Or the day she planned and executed her escape with the result leading to the Police picking her up a block away because she was too cute and groomed to be a stray.  The officer told us she rode the whole shift in the police car with her head out the window.  We recovered her at the police station where served an hour sentence in the cage.  Or the groomer that refused to groom her anymore because when they caged her, she became a miniature "Cujo" and tore up the cage as well as any towels she could get her paws or teeth into.  I also remember the excitement when any of us would come home.  The announcement and greeting at the door, the jump into our laps, and the constant snuggling-in when I would play with the kids on the floor.  She always wanted to be close and part of the activities.  She was an integral part of our family.

Keeping to the theme of photography, I now have a deeper understanding and respect for pet photographers.  I did not have enough pictures of our smallest family member.  Maybe because photographing our pet was always so difficult.  She was in constant motion and never obeyed any complex commands with the exception of sit and stay.  This must be a very difficult line of work.  Pet photographers require patience and must have a great love for animals.  This line of work is so important because I believe families need a memory archive of pets, the same as those maintained for children.  Today we looked back and was grateful for what we had, but it would have been nice to have had the foresight to have a few professional pictures taken.

I did not think that letting an animal go would be as difficult as it became.  Guilt came over me as I thought about the decision that it was her time to go, even though I knew she was tired.  After returning home I did receive her sign.  A sign that let me know she was now happy and content, I was kissed by my first butterfly of the season.  Before walking into my home I stopped to take a deep breath and admire the new blooming flowers recently planted by my grandson and me.  As I stood, a butterfly emerged from the bustle of colors and fluttered closely to my cheek, then quickly headed up the street as if to say "catch me if you can".  At that moment I knew I made the right decision and she was once again running up and down the street knowing that she finally made her escape.

Farewell Nikki the "Mutt", thanks for bringing us joy and being a big part of the family.

Enjoy and remember,

"Moments in time are lived once. Images of those moments live forever."

Ed H.
 

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(Ed Hineline Jr) animal blog camera dog heaven image journal mutt peek-a-poo pet pet photography photography https://www.edhineline.com/blog/2014/8/nikki-dog Sun, 10 Aug 2014 04:07:48 GMT
Graduation 2014 - Shaking a Thousand Hands https://www.edhineline.com/blog/2014/6/graduation-2014-shaking-a-thousand-hands High School Graduation 2014High School Graduation 2014 June is the time of year when thousands of high school seniors gather in performing arts centers and auditoriums donning colorful caps and gowns.  They anxiously listen to speeches and fidget in their seats waiting for the moment when their name is announced and the walk begins across the stage to get their diploma, shake hands with dignitaries, and revel to the cheers from family members.  This year I attended a graduation and shot pictures from the upper level.  Dark venues are always a challenge, but an ISO between 1000 and 3200, 1/80sec shutter speed, and my 70-300mm zoom lens gave me fairly good results.  Memories were captured.  This ceremony turned out to be only the beginning of an experience never to be forgotten.

I had the opportunity to attend five ceremonies this year, one as a spectator and four others on stage to congratulate each student on their accomplishments.  Being on stage and shaking over a thousand hands had to be one of the most rewarding experiences of my life.  I watched the young women and men parade to their seats as their families cheered and camera flashes fired.  Memories of my own High School Class of '78 graduation at the Dania Jai Alai Fronton started flooding my consciousness. Memories of my college graduation, and the ceremonies of my children.  I now consider these graduations as being singular.  My focus was on me or my child walking across the stage.  I didn't really see anyone else.  Once the single name was called and I cheered, the graduation was basically over.  As I sat on the stage this year I was able to see the faces of many of the students.  The faces were intent on listening to every word being spoken, I could feel their energy.

Graduation 2014Graduation 2014 The speeches I heard had much more meaning, especially listening to the young adults.  The Valedictorians and Salutatorians were good but nothing would have prepared me when I listened to the students from a unique school speak about the hardships they encountered in their lives and how determined they were to graduate.  As the evenings progressed, I had the opportunity to shake hands with every student and say congratulations on their efforts.  Every student was bright eyed with big smiles.  I could individually see the confidence in each as they looked into my eyes and said thank you to my congratulatory comments.  Some thanked me for caring enough to attend.  I had sitting beside me elementary and middle school principals that showed elation when they recognized their previous students and hugs were given for helping them reach this milestone in their lives.  Following the last handshake and the turning of the tassels, I was energized and finally understood why I am an advocate for education.

Some of these young women and men will go to college, some into the military, some straight into the workforce.  I heard some say that their interest was in the arts and photography.  I hope for those that choose to pursue photography as a career or as a hobby, elicit the same excitement and confidence I observed at these graduations.  Attending and being on stage was a new perspective that only a few experience, I was truly fortunate.  Next time I am going to try and bring my camera, It should be fun and different.  And by all means, if asked again, I am more than willing to shake a thousand or more hands.

Have you had a similar experience, I'd like to hear about it.

Enjoy and remember,

"Moments in time are lived once. Images of those moments live forever."

Ed H.
 

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(Ed Hineline Jr) blog camera ceremony exciting graduation high school photography student https://www.edhineline.com/blog/2014/6/graduation-2014-shaking-a-thousand-hands Mon, 09 Jun 2014 02:41:50 GMT
The Backyard Fire Pit https://www.edhineline.com/blog/2014/1/fire-pit Backyard Fire Pit LogsBackyard Fire Pit LogsBackyard Fire Pit Logs It doesn't get cold in South Florida very often, but when it does it's the perfect opportunity to burn a few logs in the fire pit while siting outside talking and watching the stars.  As the flames grew taller and the logs got hotter with a nice orange glow, I thought this was a great opportunity to grab my camera and telephoto lens for some cold weather shooting. 

The flames in the pit were mesmerizing.  Constantly changing shape as the flames reached for the sky with popping sounds of embers exploding from extreme heat.  I found shooting the flames and glowing embers to be very challenging because of the rapid light fluctuations.  I quickly learned that this was going to be high speed continuous shooting with manual settings and a high ISO.  This was what I consider a high failure rate shoot.  For every area of fire that I thought would be interesting to shoot, I set my ISO, shutter speed, aperture, and focus as best as possible and just held my finger down on the shutter button.  My camera fired like a machine gun.  For every twenty five shots, I got one image that was worth reviewing.  I was amazed at how quickly the light changed in my viewfinder.

Click here to see my images of the "The Fire Pit" in my "Just Walking" Gallery.

Have you had a similar experience, I'd like to hear about it.

Enjoy and remember,

"Moments in time are lived once. Images of those moments live forever."

Ed H.

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(Ed Hineline Jr) ash ashes blog burn camera ember fire fire pit flame glow glowing heat hot image journal log logs marshmallow photo photography toasted wood https://www.edhineline.com/blog/2014/1/fire-pit Mon, 20 Jan 2014 03:16:34 GMT
Christmas Tree Cemetery https://www.edhineline.com/blog/2014/1/christmas-tree-cemetery Christmas Tree CemeteryChristmas Tree CemeteryChristmas Tree Cemetery Every Christmas season has to come to an end.  Just as the bringing of the Christmas tree home signified the start of the Christmas season, taking the tree down and loading it into the truck for recycling symbolizes the end for me.  Every year I take the tree to our local park for recycling. This year instead of just seeing piles of dead and dying trees, I saw a "Christmas Tree Cemetery" of Carolina and Canadian Fraser Firs that provided joy and happiness to families during the Christmas season.  I couldn't miss the rare opportunity to photograph this once a year ritual.

Christmas is a joyous time of the year.  One of our most important and favorite Christmas traditions is visiting our church Christmas Tree stand and searching for the very best tree on the lot.  The tree we take home has to meet very specific criteria: it must be full; it must be nine to ten feet tall; it must not have any "holes"; it must be fresh with soft needles; and it must be perfectly shaped with a top suitable to hold the Angel.  Since we ask the church volunteers to rip open, stand up, and bounce so many trees, we know after we head for home they talk negatively and condemn us to sit in the front row Sunday's Service.  This year we once again found our perfect piece of the forest, which we loaded into the truck and took home for decorating.  Our Christmas tree is the central focal point for everyone visiting our home during the four week holiday season.

Just as it is fun and exciting to bring the tree home and decorate, it's also sad and depressing when we start the process of meticulously and carefully removing every piece of tinsel and all the ornaments from dried out branches with razor sharp needles that provide my yearly acupuncture treatment.  It never fails that someone in my family decided to place three or four ornaments deep into the tree which require the precision of a military extraction to get them out without serious injury.  We have a tradition of hiding on the tree a "pickle" ornament and it's believed that who ever finds it at the end of Christmas will have good luck through out the upcoming year.  This nonedible "pickle" is always hidden the deepest and the finder is guaranteed to be bandaged after the extraction with potential hospitalization.  No surprise, I've found it the last two years.  After our final ornament check with powerful flash lights and lasers looking for any unnatural reflections and glows, the tree was bagged and dragged across the living room and out the front door leaving a massive trail of fallen needles and spilled excess water from the base.  This year my six year old grandson and I loaded the tree into the back of my truck for what now could be considered a Christmas Tree "Hearse" that everyone avoided trailing on the journey because the needles in the wind served as what could be best described as pygmy blowpipe projectiles bouncing off their vehicle.

Christmas Tree CemeteryChristmas Tree CemeteryChristmas Tree Cemetery As in the past when my daughter and I would drop off the tree for recycling, a new sense of sadness started to be realized as my grandson and I drove down the park dirt road.  As we came over the hill, the piles of abandoned trees began to come into focus with the realization that these vibrant and living trees had provided tremendous joy over the last four weeks with bright lights and reminders of past happy times with family heirlooms hanging from their branches.  Children awoke with amazement in their eyes and excitement in their voices trying to understand how all the colorful packages magically appeared under the protective canopy of the lower branches.  This year the recycling site transformed into a final resting place where these majestic trees were prepared  to be sent back to nature and provided further good for our environment.

After delivering the tree I returned to document my perceived cemetery.  I started looking at the trees with a different frame of mind.  Tree stands began to look like crosses. I observed what I refer to different states of tree rigor mortis, very brown to somewhat green.  Each tree had it's own personality, which was an extension of it owner.  There were tall and short trees, skinny and fat trees,  white flocked trees, and even a red flocked tree.  Some stacked neatly, other cast off to the side.  While most of the trees were resting in their whole state, some trees were mutilated by their owners either by the removal of branches leaving just the inner truck or breaking the tree in half.  There were trees laid to rest with which what its owners seemed to intentionally want to maintain the decorated beauty with shining tinsel still adorning branches.  For the first time I was seeing and photographing a pile of trees from a totally different perspective.

My camera makes me look at situations in a different light enabling me to explore and document details generally overlooked in everyday life.  Through my photography I am realizing a better understanding what may be considered mundane activities that are very similar to others which can be humorous, sad, and exciting with life long memories attached.  The next time you drop off your Christmas Tree for recycling or leave it on the street for bulk pickup, remember the joys and say farewell with a smile.

Click here to see all of my images of the "Christmas Tree Cemetery" in my "Just Walking" Gallery.

Have you had a similar experience, I'd like to hear about it.

Enjoy and remember,

"Moments in time are lived once. Images of those moments live forever."

Ed H.

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(Ed Hineline Jr) blog camera cemetery Christmas Fraser Fraser Firs holiday image journal photo photography Tree https://www.edhineline.com/blog/2014/1/christmas-tree-cemetery Sat, 11 Jan 2014 18:45:42 GMT
"Hell on Wheels" - Empowering the Disabled https://www.edhineline.com/blog/2014/1/empowered-disabled Disabled Parking SymbolDisabled Parking SymbolCracked Painted Disabled Parking Symbol on Black Asphalt

In July of 2007 I walked out of my office building and noticed the disabled parking symbol painted on the black asphalt.  Typically I see these symbols painted in blue as opposed to white.  What caught my attention was how the prevalence of asphalt cracks stood out.  I was struck by the irony of how this perfectly painted symbol stood out on such an imperfect canvas.  After seeing what I photographed, I created a modification which I titled "Hell on Wheels - Empowering the Disabled" which was inspired by a young man hired in my division as a draftsman that was severely disabled.  He was my inspiration because he did not have the ability to use his arms or legs and he lived in his wheelchair.  He was a very competent draftsman and performed his duties through verbal commands to the computer system.  His attitude was that he could accomplish anything he wanted, I would tell him often that he was "Hell on Wheels".  I did not realize the significance of all this until 2011 when my daughter became disabled herself.

In August 2011, at the beginning of my daughters high school senior year, she was given a meningitis vaccination that caused an onset of what is now believed to be Guillain-Barre Syndrome.  A person who appeared to be perfectly healthy now had issues walking.  Over the next nine months she needed the assistance of a walker and physical therapy to get from one location to another.  Fortunately she has recovered and is now walking, running, and participating in an exercise program at the local gym.

Hell on Wheels, Empowering the DisabledHell on Wheels, Empowering the DisabledTribute to the spirit of the disabled. Knowing what I now know, I am resurrecting the images from 2007.  These images are dedicated to anyone inflicted with some type of disability and made the decision to not give up and continue to move forward.  My daughter decided that she was going to finish her senior year, and she did.  She decided she was going to walk across the graduation stage without a walker, and she did even though it was very difficult.

My images are intended to empower individuals to be the very best that they can be.  My draftsman colleague and daughter refused to allow their physical situation hold them back from accomplishing there goals.  My hopes are that someone will see the image and say to themselves, "Yes, I am " 'Hell on Wheels'".

Have you had a similar experience, I'd like to hear about it.

Enjoy and remember,

"Moments in time are lived once. Images of those moments live forever."

Ed H.

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(Ed Hineline Jr) blog camera disabled empower handicapped image journal photo photography https://www.edhineline.com/blog/2014/1/empowered-disabled Sat, 04 Jan 2014 23:23:47 GMT
A Trip to the Zoo https://www.edhineline.com/blog/2013/11/zoo I took my grandson to Zoo Miami to checkout all the different wildlife and just spend an afternoon together.  This trip was a great opportunity to stroll the park and shoot images.  To my surprise the animals were relatively close and some actually appeared to enjoy posing.  I had a lot of fun as a Dromedary Camel walked up within about twenty five feet and almost seemingly begged me to shoot it's picture.  My thoughts immediately went to "What Day Is It... It's Hump Day!!!"  I thought it was hilarious how it would look straight into the camera and then give me a proud profile. 

The camel wasn't my only subject for the day.  As I walked down the path I started getting this creepy feeling of being watched.  As I looked around I spotted this Lowland Gorilla "eye-balling" me as it sat very proud and definitely in-charge.  The eye's of the animal were saying "I am here, you are there, don't mess with me."  I was as fascinated with this animal as I believe it was with me.  I wish I had more time to watch. 

I don't know why as I walked, all the animals just seemed to be looking at me.  Some with a serious expressions, others having a sense of confusion.     The more I walked, the more I began to realize that the animals were not on exhibit for me to see, but rather I was on exhibit for their benefit. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now there were other animals that appeared to care less about anything.  The Cuban Crocodile just wanted to sleep and the Malayan Water Monitor wanted to sun itself on the rocks.

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What a great day.  I highly recommend if you get the chance to visit a zoo, take your time and study the wildlife around you.  Visualize the animals perspective so that when you leave and view your pictures you have a story to tell.  Because you never know what stories are being told about you when gates close. 

Click here to see my full Wildlife Gallery.

Have you had a similar experience, I'd like to hear about it.

Enjoy and remember,

"Moments in time are lived once. Images of those moments live forever."

Ed H.

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(Ed Hineline Jr) Cuban Crocodile Dromedary Camel Malayan Water Monitor blog camera image journal photo photography zoo https://www.edhineline.com/blog/2013/11/zoo Fri, 22 Nov 2013 04:32:35 GMT
Boston Marathon 2013 "Running Shoes Memorial" https://www.edhineline.com/blog/2013/6/boston-marathon-2013-memorial  

I had the pleasure of traveling to Boston for a short vacation.  This trip provided me the perfect opportunity to walk the city and find interesting areas to photograph. As I walked, my wife pointed out to me the Finish Line for the Boston Marathon.  My heart immediately went into my throat.  I didn't realize exactly where I was, or was I looking for the landmark.  This bright yellow line that stretched completely across the street had new meaning to me.  Not only does it represent the end of a long hard race, it also signifies the end of the pain the citizens of the City of Boston endured during and after the marathon bombings.

As I walked further down the street I came across one of the bombing sites.  My thoughts turned to anger.  As I observed the site, my daughter asked me if I had seen what she referred to as the "Running Shoes Memorial" in Copley Square, just up the street across from the Boston Public Library.  I had missed it.  Earlier in the day I walked through the area but Copley Square had a Farmers Market in progress with tents and vendors obstructing my view.  Based upon the emotions I was feeling I made a promise to myself to revisit the area the next day.  I'm glad I did, I will never forget the "Running Shoes Memorial" and I had to photographically document what I experienced.

I arrived at Copley Square early the next morning before a lot of people.  The area was eerily quiet with a few people reading the tributes left to victims and to the city itself - "Boston Strong".  People left these tributes on hundreds of pairs of running shoes, notes, baseball caps, and shirts.  The tributes came from people near and afar.  I was so touched by the experience that I spent about an hour and a half reading and photographing the outpouring of emotions.  As the morning continued, more people arrived to observe the laced-up foot apparel.  What was amazing was that people observed all the placed objects with dignity and reverence.  The area remained quiet and people avoided touching objects and stepping on anything that was on the ground.  This area appeared to be hollowed grounds that elicited the strength and compassion of the people of Boston and our nation.

Above I've included a slide show of my experience at the "Running Shoes Memorial".  I hope you feel as much emotion from the images as I did in photographing my experience. "Boston Strong"!!!

Click here to view my "Running Shoes Memorial" gallery.

Have you visited the 'Running Shoes Memorial", I'd like to hear about it.

Enjoy and remember,

"Moments in time are lived once. Images of those moments live forever."

Ed H.

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(Ed Hineline Jr) Boston Boston Marathon blog camera image journal memorial photo photography running shoe tribute https://www.edhineline.com/blog/2013/6/boston-marathon-2013-memorial Fri, 07 Jun 2013 17:54:40 GMT
My Photo Book Through Mixbook.com https://www.edhineline.com/blog/2013/5/photobook

I received an email from a fellow church parishioner requesting advice in creating a "picture book" for her only grandson who was graduating from high school, in just two short weeks.  I was a bit apprehensive to get involved due to the fact that I hadn't created a book in about three years; the time-line was very short; and she described herself as "I just don't move as fast as I used to (I'm 76) and time is scarce".  I thought this email could lead to one of those "feel good" experiences or more than likely be the "book from hell".  The good news is I decided to help and she turned out to be a very nice and capable person that was an energetic ball of energy which made this project a lot of fun.  My decision turned out to be a rare "I FEEL GREAT" experience, which prompted me to create my own book and share my thoughts.

I've been publishing my photography online for a few years and didn't consider creating a book until I found Mixbook.com through online reviews.  My new friend needed a fast and easy way to create a book and during my research it took me only about ten minutes to create a free account, a project, upload some images, start making a book, and get a very good understanding of the workflow.  The process was straight forward and understandable.  I was able to teach my senior friend so effectively that she was able to make the book for her grandson herself.  I only made minor modifications and provided some simple advice when she had questions.

After helping her make the book I decided to use my images and create a custom book of my own, "Through My Eyes".  The total time from creation to order was about six hours, with the majority of time spent on finding and uploading images (high resolution), and researching captions for the pages.  Here are the functions I liked about the online application:

  • It was free to register and begin creating the book
  • I did not have to download any programs to my computer, everything was through the website
  • I could have others collaborate online with the creation
  • Links were provided to share the book or embed the book in a website, without a cost
  • Many customizable predefined themes
  • Many customizable page templates
  • Picture upload was easy and fast with image thumbnails cataloged showing which were used in the book.  (There was also integration to popular photo sharing sites)
  • Drag and drop ability to place pictures on the page
  • Easy ability to move, resize, rotate, zoom, and make minor image adjustments
  • Multiple layers of “undo” to test the placement and editing of images and text
  • Easily create and edit customized text with multiple fonts
  • Easy to reorder pages
  • Easy to order and publish the final book.

There were some things that would help the program, but did not have any effect on my book or my positive experience:

  • I was unable to edit my book or view the published book from my Apple iPad, the program works with “Adobe Flash” which is not supported
  • I would like integration to my Zenfolio account where I host my photography.  To ensure I used images from my site, I downloaded from Zenfolio and then uploaded to Mixbook.

Mixbook.com is a very good book making website.  I received my book one day earlier than I expected and am very pleased with the quality of the binding, images, and paper.  The book arrived via US Mail and was professionally packaged to avoid damage.  Also to my surprise, the book was shrink-wrapped for additional protection in the package.  If you're interested in seeing the book I'm providing the link below.  Mixbook.com does have an Affiliate Program which I'm attaching to the link to see how the program works.

Click here to view the book.

Have you created a photography book, I'd like to hear about it.

Enjoy and remember,

"Moments in time are lived once. Images of those moments live forever."

Ed H.

Appreciation Letter

As a follow-up I sent my senior friend an email asking her if she received the book and if the book met her expectations.  Below is her unedited response with the exception that identifications have been removed:

"Ed,

Sorry you got ahead of me, I've been thinking of you, wanting to thank you big time...just haven't had the time to get a thank you card...I want a special one...THANK YOU Ed for all the help, I could have not done it without your help and guidance...

My family loved it, my grandson was so happy he told me several times how much he loved it, I knew he would love it... I don't know if I had mentioned to you that when I sent them a greeting card, I paste photo of them (my family) all over the greeting card, making it something like a collage of photo...my grandson loves getting them, so those my granddaughter.

I said to Kevin...."this you'll take with you to college so that you can reminisce from time to time"....and he said  "you right Nani, this comes with me" my granddaughter, Lauren, said..."Nani I want one"

The people at Mixbook are AWESOME, I must have drove them crazy with emails regarding the 'delivery' date...etc.
but they answered immediately to each of my emails.

I received the package Friday about 8:00am, I left them a message at the door for UPS to leave the package at my neighbor's apt.
they called me and I told  they had it, on my way to the luncheon I to get Kevin's gift....

Mixbook called me that Friday as I was waiting in line to sit for the graduation at Nova University, I told them that the package had arrived and after the Graduation on my way to the luncheon I was going to get it.

I sent an E-mail to Mixbook complementing them all for their service and patience with me, I told  them that I was more then please,
looking forward to do others.  I also told them that my granddaughter wants one...

THANK YOU AGAIN, MAY GOD BLESS YOU ALWAYS,
Sincerely,
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx"

 

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(Ed Hineline Jr) Mixbook blog camera creativity image journal photo photography photography book scrapbook https://www.edhineline.com/blog/2013/5/photobook Sun, 26 May 2013 04:28:51 GMT
"Kain" - The Weimaraner Puppy https://www.edhineline.com/blog/2013/2/weimaraner Weimaraner Puppy - Cain_MG_0593 Puppies are cute, cuddly, generally _MG_0639 chew everything, and occasionally leave small puddles on the tiled floor.  Recently our son and his girlfriend introduced us to Kain, their six week old blue eyed Weimaraner with a beautiful bluish grey coat.  Kain, the newest member of our family, immediately caught my attention because of his bright blue eyes and stub for a tail.  While watching this pup chew on my sneaker string I immediately knew I was in the midst of a perfect photo opportunity.  I've shot images of birds, alligators, adults, and children, but have never taken pictures of an active puppy before. 

Kain learned the house very quickly, finding the food bowls of our other two dogs wasn't even a challenge for his sense of smell.  I watched in amazement as the five pound wonder pup ate like a hungry bear.  The other dogs looked at the empty bowls wondering when the eating machine was going to leave their territory.   We put Kain in the back yard and he immediately bolted with his long lanky legs and feet going in all directions but forward.  Knowing that I wouldn't be able to get close enough to this vivacious animal for good images, I decided to shoot all my pictures with a 70 - 300mm lens set to auto focus on a moving object (AI Servo), a moving object that was going to experience all aspects of my patio and backyard as quickly as possible.  This shoot was more difficult than I had expected, mostly because it was more fun to watch the infant stumble around the yard than press the camera shutter button.  Kain found an old bone that he started to chew and carry around the patio.  The way he carried the bone in his mouth reminded me of how the great WC Fields used to hang a cigar from the side of his mouth in his old time movies.  Kain wasn't intimidated by the size of bone either. 

Kain is a welcome new member to our family.  I believe that as he grows I'm going to get more photo opportunities of this fabulous animal.  Hopefully he'll move a little slower for me and my camera. _MG_0599 Do you have a pet photography story, let me know.

Enjoy and remember,

"Moments in time are lived once. Images of those moments live forever."

Ed H.

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(Ed Hineline Jr) blog blue camera dog eye image journal photo photography playfull puppy weimaraner https://www.edhineline.com/blog/2013/2/weimaraner Tue, 05 Feb 2013 03:02:31 GMT
Divine Events https://www.edhineline.com/blog/2013/1/divine-events I've always been involved in some capacity with church activities.  In recent years my contribution has been to use my camera skills in capturing activities and events.  From time to time something spiritually spectacular transpires and I always hope to be in the right place at the right time.  Two such events occurred that were completely unplanned and pleasantly surprising. The first event was at the Our Lady of Florida Spiritual Center where the sun shined through dark morning storm clouds silhouetting the center's large spiritual cross located in the meditation yard.  The second event was the rainbow-like colors that draped the Corpus at St. Mark Catholic Church when an afternoon setting sun pierced through a stained glass window.  I feel so fortunate that I was able to capture these images.

Cross Silhouette

Every year the Men's Club from my church attends a weekend retreat at the Our Lady of Florida Spiritual Center.  This one retreat I attended in October 2010 was a weekend of inspirational talks, camaraderie, and quite time to reflect on my current situations.  I brought my camera to capture images of the weekend events with the beauty and sanctity of the center's grounds.  The center is very close to the Southeast Florida coast with its meditation grounds on the Intracoastal Waterway.  I knew that one of my photographic goals for the weekend was to get a shot of the large cross during a sunrise.  On Sunday morning I set out early only to find that very dark and heavy storm clouds had rolled in and completely negated any chances of capturing a sunrise.  I walked around the center in disappointment when I came across a friend who said he was heading out to the area.  As I followed him, to my surprise, a slit in the storm clouds began to open showering the coast in streams of light.  This became the perfect opportunity to shoot the cross silhouette.  My friend is very spiritual and he said to me "I knew the clouds were going to open up for you".  I'm glad I followed.

Corpus at St. Mark Catholic ChurchCorpus at St. Mark Catholic Church, Southwest Ranches, Florida

Color Draped Corpus

My church celebrated its 25th Anniversary with a mass which I volunteered to photograph.  The mass was celebrated at 5:00 PM on a Saturday afternoon.  My typical setup is to traverse the back of the church with the telephoto lens and monopod.  On this day as the mass continued, sunlight began to slowly stream through a stained glass window.  Over the next five to ten minutes a rainbow moved across the Corpus and the back wall of the Alter.  I have attended many masses during this time frame and had never witnessed this phenomenon before.  As quickly as the colors began, they also faded.  I was very fortunate to be in the position I was in to capture this spectacular event.  Following the mass many of my friends noted seeing the transformation and felt blessed as well.

I feel very fortunate to have been able to capture these events as they were happening.  I am also glad to hear from the people who have been touched by these images which is big part of the reason why I love photography.

Have you photographed any "Devine Events", I'd like to hear about them.

Enjoy and remember,

"Moments in time are lived once. Images of those moments live forever."

Ed H.

 

 

 

 

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(Ed Hineline Jr) Corpus Cross blog camera catholic christian color faith image journal photo photography rainbow spiritual sunrise https://www.edhineline.com/blog/2013/1/divine-events Mon, 21 Jan 2013 19:14:42 GMT
Cancer Keys https://www.edhineline.com/blog/2013/1/cancer-keys Cancer Keys No one ever expects a family member to be diagnosed with cancer, but it does happen.  When cancer crippled my family the doctors told us that treatment was a "process" and we had to follow the "process" for the best chance of survival.  Each time we drove across the State of Florida to Tampa for treatment, our journey was part of our prescribed "process".  We would arrive at the hospital valet parking driveway and I would hand my keys to the attendant.  The person would rip the ticket and hand me half.  As we walked across the driveway and through the revolving door, I would always look back and see my vehicle pull away into the garage.  Leaving my vehicle was always the beginning of that day's "process" and the attendants always followed the same procedure.  It was like clockwork.  That would be the last I saw of my keys until we finished with the doctors.  When our day was complete we always exited back through the revolving doors and I would give my valet stub to the attendant, who would then open a cabinet door, grab my keys, and sprint to the garage for my vehicle.  Within a few minutes we would be on our way back across the State to our home.

While waiting for my vehicle during one of our trips I noticed the attendant had left the key cabinet door open.  When I looked inside I noticed an incredible number of keys. "Cancer Keys" immediately came to mind. Cancer Keys   All I could think of was that there were so many families being represented in this box, so much sadness.  On this day I felt like I had to shoot images, just because there were so many and as some keys went home, others would take their place.  The box remained full.  As I observed the cabinet contents I realized that these were not just keys, they represented personalities waiting for a "process" to be completed.  There was a Power Puff Girl, gym membership passes, a Miami Dolphin football tag, and many straps and hooks to latch onto more objects.  To me these were all symbols of strength.  Strength needed to fight the cancer, either as a patient or as a caregiver.

At first seeing all these keys gave me a sense of sadness, just because of the sheer volume.  But after the attendant brought my vehicle and we started to leave I realized that all of these keys represented the end of a daily fight and going home.  Heading to where we belong, where we are comfortable and loved.  They represented hope for a lot of families.

My family was fortunate, our overall "process" has ended on a positive note.  We still have to visit Tampa for check-ups but I know my "Cancer Keys" will be waiting to take us home.  I'm glad I had my camera on that day and captured these images.  They are a reminder of how fortunate we are and that there is great work being accomplished to help people get back home.

Have you had a similar experience, I'd like to hear about it.

Enjoy and remember,

"Moments in time are lived once. Images of those moments live forever."

Ed H.

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(Ed Hineline Jr) blog camera cancer hope image journal key key chain objects photo photography power strength vehicle https://www.edhineline.com/blog/2013/1/cancer-keys Fri, 18 Jan 2013 05:05:48 GMT
Wakodahatchee Wetlands, Beautiful Nature Trail https://www.edhineline.com/blog/2012/9/wakodahatchee I've been looking for a local nature area that has an abundance and wide variety of wildlife, I believe I've found one.  I met a person that is an expert in "birding" and asked if there was a local sanctuary that was representative of the everglades.  He resoundingly recommended the Wakodahachee Wetlands in Delray Beach, Florida.  I was pleasantly surprised and thoroughly enjoyed my adventure.  

I arrived at the park at approximately 7:30AM.  Unfortunately I missed the sunrise, but do plan to return now that I have the lay-of-the-land.  The wetlands has an elevated walkway that traverses about a mile through the park.  At every turn there were wonderful opportunities to photograph the wildlife and vegetation.  I was not fifty yards into my walk when I encountered what appeared to be a very stealth ten foot alligator on the prowl for breakfast.  While I was watching, the gator slowly stalked a nearby white egret.  With amazing speed the gator made a failed attempt at grasping the bird in it's powerful jaws.  The quick and agile thrash of the gator alerted all of the nearby wildlife and caused a sudden flurry of various birds to quickly reposition themselves to perceived safer locations.  Having given up it's position, the gator slowly swam toward me and then under the protected walkway passing within about three feet.  This was exciting to watch but to my dismay I was not completely ready to shoot the action.  I had my camera and telephoto lens trained on different aspects of the wildlife, I was shooting images as well as observing all the players in this natural game of "Let's Have Breakfast Together".  My instincts told me that something was about to happen and I got caught up in observing as opposed to documenting.  To my own defense, the action event happened in the blink of an eye.  As a photographer I need to trust my instincts and not get caught up in the moment and anticipate what may happen next.

The rest of my walk was not as exciting and eventful, even though I was able to clearly identify the presence of two additional large alligators.  I was surprised by the start of a series of very loud growls that even made the seasoned early morning exercisers on the walkway stop in their tracks.  Across the waterway at about one hundred yards, too far to photograph effectively with my 70-300mm telephoto lens, was a very large gator on the surface with it's snout in the air and arching it's back.  Regulars at the park were not sure if it was a mating call or a warning to stay away.  For me it meant stay away, it was loud and extremely ominous.

As the morning progressed more people began to arrive, most of whom had their cameras.  What I liked about the people I observed was that everyone respected the wildlife and environment they were observing.  People talked and walked quietly.  This human quietness enhanced my experience because I noticeably focused on the natural sounds of the birds, crickets, and gators.   Many of the visitors acknowledged my presence by saying good morning and giving me hints on where there may be some current activity.  My walk was a very pleasurable activity.  I walked the entire wetland course photographing as much as I could access and started my return home about 9:30AM.

If you're interested in photographing a wide variety of birds and some alligators in a natural environment, I recommend visiting the Wakodahatchee Wetlands in Delray Beach, Florida.  I will be returning.  My next visit will most likely be in the late afternoon so that I can get a different photographic perspective of the park with the sun coming from the west as opposed from the east.  I anticipate the experience to be just as gratifying.

I'm always looking for new nature sites to photograph.  Please share any locations you think would be interesting to photograph.

If you would like to see my pictorial, click here.

Enjoy and remember,

"Moments in time are lived once. Images of those moments live forever."

Ed H.

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(Ed Hineline Jr) Wakodahachee Wakodahachee Wetlands alligators animal bird birds blog camera color environment gators grass green image journal landscape nature outdoor park photo photography reflection sky trees vegitation water wetlands wildlife https://www.edhineline.com/blog/2012/9/wakodahatchee Sun, 30 Sep 2012 15:38:35 GMT
The Locust https://www.edhineline.com/blog/2012/6/locust   Sometimes an opportunity presents itself and as a photographer you have to react. This locust decided to hitchhike a ride on my truck which provided me the perfect opportunity to get some colorful shots.

I was driving home when my wife said with excitement in her voice "look out your window!"  To my disbelief, hanging on to my window for it's life, was a locust. Traveling at 45 miles an hour, this locust was walking along my window trying to find a position that did not have as much wind draft.  When I pulled into my driveway, this locust was still with me and began to explore every aspect of my truck.  I quickly grabbed my camera and began shooting the travels of this locust.

Shooting this insect was interesting because at times it almost seemed as if it was posing.  I had to be very patient, since locust move very slowly.  The biggest issue I had was getting close enough to capture the detailed colors.  I shot the locust with my Canon EOS 7D. I first used my Canon 70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS USM Telephoto Lens, then switched to my 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS Lens.  Following this shoot, I am now considering the purchase of a quality macro lens.  My 70-300mm did not give me the depth of field that I was looking for and my 18-135mm did not allow me to get as close as I wanted to be, even though there is macro setting on the lens.  My disappointment after reviewing the pictures was that I could not get what I consider a "sharp-as-a-tack" picture.  I would rate the quality of these images at a 5 on a scale of 1 to 10.  I do like the color and composition.  A few images were post processed with an HDR program to enhance some color and show detail in shadows.

I'm hoping I get the opportunity again to get images of the locust, while also hoping it does not eat all of my plants.  Keep the camera handy, you never know when an opportunity is going to present itself. 

Let me know if you have had any similar photography experiences.

Click here if you would like to see the images of the locust.

Enjoy and remember,

"Moments in time are lived once. Images of those moments live forever."

Ed H.

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(Ed Hineline Jr) acridid animal antenna antennae blog bug camera cicada colorful creature creepy cricket garden grasshopper image insect invertebrate journal leg locust nature organism photo photography wild wildlife https://www.edhineline.com/blog/2012/6/locust Mon, 18 Jun 2012 03:23:20 GMT
The Making of a Super Hero https://www.edhineline.com/blog/2012/6/superhero _MG_4569 Photographing children can be an extremely rewarding experience, especially when you find a child that has a vivid imagination and believes he's a real Super Hero. This four year old dawned his mask and cape to conceal his identity and was ready to take on any evil forces that dared to enter his backyard lair.

This was a fun shoot because the youngster was fully engaged in his character and all I had to do was stand aside and shoot with my Canon EOS 7D, 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS lens. I made every effort to remain neutral in his environment but it became more fun for me to be the "bad guy" at times and play into his imagination by telling him that my camera was a secret ray gun that he had to defend against.

I believe that photography gives us the opportunity to capture special moments in time, especially of children growing up. I believe this is one of those special moments.

Have you photographed a Super Hero in your life?  Let me know.

Click here to view the images of this very special "Super Hero".

Enjoy and remember,

"Moments in time are lived once. Images of those moments live forever."

Ed H.

 

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(Ed Hineline Jr) blog camera cape childhood crime excitement fantasy fighter fun hero image imagination journal mask photo photography super https://www.edhineline.com/blog/2012/6/superhero Fri, 15 Jun 2012 16:53:13 GMT
Parking Space for a Tree https://www.edhineline.com/blog/2012/2/parking-space Florida Oak I recently was driving through a nearby neighborhood and was surprised to see a very large Florida Oak tree taking up a parking space in one of the areas parking lots.  It's obvious the tree has been here for a very long time and the parking lot had been resurfaced at some point with lines and bumpers repainted.  I hope this space is not for the "Employee of the Month".  Fortunately I had my camera.

Have you ever photographed an oddity?  I would enjoy hearing about other situations.

Enjoy and remember,

"Moments in time are lived once. Images of those moments live forever."

Ed H.

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(Ed Hineline Jr) Florida blog camera image journal lot oak parking photo photography space tree https://www.edhineline.com/blog/2012/2/parking-space Mon, 20 Feb 2012 17:05:47 GMT
The Wedding https://www.edhineline.com/blog/2012/2/the-wedding I've attended many weddings, including my own, where I was able to observe the wedding photographer shooting images of the ceremony,  family members, and the reception.  From an observers point of view, shooting a wedding appeared to be a routine operation.  I believed this until I was presented the opportunity to shoot a wedding myself.

A young lady that works for me approached me stating that a couple she knew was getting married and there was an issue with engagement photos that were taken.  They needed new photos shot prior to their wedding scheduled in two weeks that would serve as part of a signing board for guests when they arrive for the wedding and reception.  The couple had an idea of what type of pictures they wanted and had a location staked out on the beach.  I agreed to shoot the images for them because I felt it would be a good learning opportunity and be fun.  As it turned out, they were a very nice couple and I learned in the days following the shoot were in need of a wedding photographer.  I agreed to help them and this is where I began to understand the true components, complexities, planning, and stresses placed on wedding photographers. 

I have a deep respect for wedding photographers now.  My father, a professional photographer, shot a couple of weddings and advised me many years ago that he would not shoot them again.  He said there was too much pressure and it was difficult to make people happy.  People were now disappointed in the quality of images, but more in how they looked.  Keeping in mind that he was shooting film as opposed to digital and did not know the quality of images until after the film was developed and the proofs were printed.  My own wedding photographer made an error in camera settings and all of my ceremony and family shots were badly underexposed.  Fortunately we owned a film processing lab and were able to fix the problem in post production.  I entered this wedding shoot very nervous because of advise and past events, but I had peace of mind knowing that the couple ensured me that they would be happy with the results however they turned out.

My Planning

Prior to the rehearsal and wedding I had the opportunity to meet the bride at the church and reception hall.  This allowed me to understand the environment and talk to her about her expectations for the shots she would like to have.  I used this time to observe lighting conditions, potential backgrounds, and general shooting opportunities.  I also took some test shots so that I would not be presented with any surprises.

The engagement photos and the wedding rehearsal were very relaxed affairs with a small number of people.  I had time to converse with the family and shoot very casual images.  These events gave me the opportunity to build a personal bond with the families and participants in the wedding.  I also witnessed how the ceremony was going to be performed and where the participants would be staged for entrances and exists.  I was determined to be prepared and not go into the wedding event "cold" and to be "shooting from the hip".

The Wedding and Reception

I never realized how much planning and quick thinking goes into shooting a wedding, as well as how "fast on their feet" a wedding photographer has to be.  I was shooting solo and arrived at the church early.  I knew when the bride and groom were going to arrive and the rooms they were going to be dressing.  What I didn't take into consideration was they both were on different schedules and the grooms dressing room was on the first floor and brides was on the second.  I was up and down the stairs with my equipment multiple times trying to capture important images as they both prepared.  An assistant would have been helpful, at a minimum just with communication.  I was able to get the pre-ceremony images I needed even though it was a little stressful.  My biggest hurdle was getting into position and shooting around other people that wanted to get quick snapshots as the bride was preparing.   My preparation was successful once the wedding started because I knew where to position myself throughout the ceremony.

I appreciate now a professional photographers aggressiveness following the ceremony to shoot the pictures of the bride, groom, family members, and friends.  I learned that there is a very tight time frame to shoot the images and it is difficult to gather the appropriate people and pose them.  Everyone wanted to congratulate the bride and groom.  This is again where an assistant would have been helpful in staging the people the bride and groom wanted photos.

Shooting the reception was a lot of fun because the atmosphere was much more relaxed, even though there were time sensitive specific activities along with special situations the bride and groom requested.  I found myself working the room taking pictures of each table, the bride and groom with guests and general photo opportunity requests.  I kept observing the room for guest emotions that would be memorable for the bride and groom.  I did learn that it's better to shoot formal and casual pictures of the bride and groom at the reception hall prior to them being announced as Mr. and Mrs.  I shot these pictures during a break in the activities and there was a little confusion due to other family members requesting pictures.

Lessons Learned

This was a very positive and fun experience.  The bride and groom were a very nice couple and they were pleased with the end product.  The valuable lessons I learned:

  • Plan the event by thoroughly communicating with the client for expectation
  • Visit the venue(s), preferably with the client, and take test shots
  • Document the special activities and requests of the bride and groom
  • Document time specific activities for photo opportunities and help the bride and groom keep the time line
  • Document the specific bride and groom requested picture opportunities
  • Document the family members and friends the bride and groom want photos taken with
  • If possible, have an assistant
  • Have backup batteries for both camera and flash
  • Have a backup camera
  • Keep an eye on the bride and groom at all times
  • Build a positive relationship with the family members if possible
  • Read professional photography books on weddings and get ideas of how to shoot special images
  • Be prepared for anything

This was a great experience for me and I may shoot another wedding if provided the opportunity.  I gained a new respect for professional wedding photographers.  Shooting a wedding is not as easy as it appears and takes a lot of planning, communication, and creativity.  Kudos to the Pros!

If you would like to see the results from the wedding click here.

Enjoy and remember,

"Moments in time are lived once. Images of those moments live forever."

Ed H.

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(Ed Hineline Jr) blog camera image journal photo photography wedding https://www.edhineline.com/blog/2012/2/the-wedding Sun, 19 Feb 2012 19:33:59 GMT
The Tokay Gecko https://www.edhineline.com/blog/2012/2/the-tokay-gecko My Tokay Gecko image is the most viewed image in my portfolio.  I never realized how many people are doing Google searches for this animal.  The shooting of this image was entirely by chance.

In November I help the church sell Christmas trees.  During the setup process one of the church members arrived with a trailer full of tree stand supplies that were stored on his property all year.  To our surprise when we were unloading plywood, this little guy jumped out with some serious attitude.  Seeing a photo opportunity I quickly grabbed my camera backpack from my truck and recruited a friend to help me shoot some images.

The steps of the setup was simple, all the while making sure that the gecko would not be injured:

  • Catch the gecko (it's scared, don't get bit)
  • Place the gecko on pallets (while it tries to run away, don't get bit)
  • Keep the gecko from running away (don't drop camera while not getting bit)
  • Pose the gecko (it's angry now, don't get bit)
  • Photograph the gecko

We were able to quickly catch the gecko in a bucket and put it on a pallet.  I was able to pose the animal and keep it in place by having a friend place his gloved hand in front of it's nose.  The gecko immediately went into a defensive position with it's mouth open to ward off the presumed attacker.  At no time was the gecko touched.  I placed my camera (Canon 50D) on the pallet and began shooting in "Live Mode" with flash.  I shot about a dozen images from different positions until I got the one I liked best.

After about ten minutes of shooting we moved the gecko back into the bucket and released it in the field behind the Christmas tree stand.  I learned to always have my camera equipment nearby.  I never know what opportunity may present itself.

If you like my gecko, let me know.

Enjoy and remember,

"Moments in time are lived once. Images of those moments live forever."

Ed H.

 

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(Ed Hineline Jr) blog camera gecko image journal lizzard photo photography red spotted tokay https://www.edhineline.com/blog/2012/2/the-tokay-gecko Sun, 19 Feb 2012 02:45:51 GMT
Flying Ibis on a Park Lake https://www.edhineline.com/blog/2012/2/flying-ibis-on-a-park-lake I've always wondered how photographers were able to capture pictures of wildlife in action.  I've never been in the right place at the right time to capture this type of image.  I have now learned that capturing these types of image takes the ability to observe, plan, and have patience.  All with a little luck.

A Little Luck

My shot was taken while I was at a picnic at a local park.  My luck comes into play because our group rented a pavilion that happened to be on a lake with many ibis scavenging for food.  The lake was positioned where the setting sun would be to my back and all I had to do was watch the feeding and flying pattern of the birds during the day. 

Observe and Plan

During the picnic I had my camera taking pictures of friends always checking the lighting.  I observed that the ibis were very comfortable with people.  The ibis stayed very close to the pavilion and loved to eat bread that was being thrown to them by little children.  All small children follow the same pattern, feed the birds and then chase the birds.  Every time the children would feed the birds, one or two would dart towards the birds which would cause the birds to fly a pattern over the lake.  Within ten minutes the birds would return and the whole process would start again.  All I had to now is wait for the lighting to be in the right position and start shooting.

Patience

The day was filled with talking to friends, cooking, eating, playing horseshoes, fishing, and waiting for the sun to be in the right position.  At about four o'clock in the afternoon the lighting was soft and I had my camera setup and a friend had bread for feeding.  I set my position parallel to where the birds would be feeding on the bank of lake.  My friend dropped the bread and just as the birds had patterned earlier in the day, they all began to feed.  On my count, my friend ran into the birds and they flew the same pattern they had earlier.  I had my focus set on infinity and began shooting in high speed continuous mode.  After the birds cleared I waited about ten minutes and the birds returned for more bread.  I repeated this pattern until I was able to get the image I needed.  It took about five feedings of the birds and approximately thirty exposures.

This was a great experience that I just happened to "luck" into and hope to have more of these opportunities.

Enjoy and remember,

"Moments in time are lived once. Images of those moments live forever."

Ed H.

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(Ed Hineline Jr) blog camera ibis image journal lake photo photography technique https://www.edhineline.com/blog/2012/2/flying-ibis-on-a-park-lake Sun, 19 Feb 2012 02:10:16 GMT
Schott Communities – Let’s Have a Party: A Rewarding Shoot! https://www.edhineline.com/blog/2012/2/schott-communities-lets-have-a-party I'm an active member of a local church located in Southwest Ranches, Florida. The Men's Club of my church sponsors many worthwhile activities and local groups, one of which being Schott Communities, "for Persons Who Are Deaf or Disabled." The Men's Club was asked to support the annual Schott Communities "Let's Have a Party" event by helping setup, tend bar, and cleanup the event. I volunteered to work the party and had no intentions of shooting pictures, except for a few images to document the Men's Club activities. I had no idea what I was about to experience.

I arrived for setup early in the day with a few Men's Club members and Schott Communities staff.  We did our typical setup of tables with the exception being we only set table cloths. There were no decorations. When I asked about the party format, it was explained that the families of the Schott Communities clients sponsor their own family table and it was their responsibility to bring food and decorate their table as they wished. We were just supplying the soda, beer, and wine. Having never experienced this type of event, I thought OK this should be interesting.

I returned with my wife just after the party start time to help serve and was amazed at what I saw. The hall had transformed itself into a myriad of colorful tables and decorations. Each table portrayed a theme that the family felt would make their deaf or disabled family member happy. I immediately felt the love and admiration these families had for each other because of the extraordinary efforts made. It was at this moment I realized that I could give of myself in a better way than just serving soda, beer, and cleaning up. I could use my camera by documenting the event and provide the images to Schott Communities and the families. I experienced:

  • The Hawaiian table with tropical foods
  • The Baseball table, an American theme with hot dogs and hamburgers
  • The Backyard table with lawn chairs and an umbrella
  • The Americana table with fried chicken, potato salad , and cold slaw
  • The South American table with Spanish style food, and
  • Many other themed tables

There were flowers, balloons, and dancing. There was a celebrity, John Denney, #97, long snapper for Miami Dolphins, who attended with his wife and two young sons. The Schott Community clients were thrilled to be able to meet and spend time with a real professional football player.

The pleasure for me was being able to take my camera and freely mingle with these fabulous families. I could feel the love through the smiles and emotions and felt this was a great opportunity to capture the event through my lens.

As I spoke to the party organizers, I learned that the party was an opportunity for the families to go out and celebrate in an environment where no one was watching, judging, or making inappropriate comments. I was presented the opportunity to capture people relaxing and "letting it all hang out" when their lives on a normal day is very stressful. The attendees were very appreciative that I wanted to take pictures of them.

I recommend if anyone ever has the opportunity to volunteer services and photograph a charitable event, do it. Do it with no expectations except for the personal gratitude of the people or staff of the event. There is a great feeling of satisfaction meeting very caring and deserving people when all is said and done.

Schott Communities - Let's Have a Party: A Very Rewarding Shoot for Me!

If you would like to see images of the event, click here.

Enjoy and remember,

"Moments in time are lived once. Images of those moments live forever."

Ed H.

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(Ed Hineline Jr) Communities Schott blog camera image journal photo photography https://www.edhineline.com/blog/2012/2/schott-communities-lets-have-a-party Sun, 19 Feb 2012 00:51:00 GMT
Micro-Stock Photography – My First $0.24! https://www.edhineline.com/blog/2012/2/microstock_photography The very first micro-stock photography image I ever sold made me a spectacular $0.24. Despite all the work, anguish, and disappointment I experienced to reach this point, that $0.24 was one of the most fulfilling photography objectives I've experienced.

Like so many other photography enthusiasts, it all began by me asking myself "how can I make money selling my pictures?" Unfortunately, I didn't have the confidence, portfolio, or pricing expertise to register for an art show booth where I would need to print an acceptable number of images in the right sizes and then sell them. I was also afraid that if I did enter a show, I wouldn't be able to compete with the professionals or be embarrassed in trying to speak intelligently about how the pictures were shot. I didn't want to get all excited because my friends told me I had great images and then endure possible disappointment. Hence I started doing my research on the internet and found all these articles about how to make money selling my images on micro-stock photography sites

My research from quite a few micro-stock websites was leading me to believe that I could make money with my images without doing any work and not having any costs. Even though my ego was telling me that I could sell my photography, quite my job, and buy a second or third home on a tropical island, the web blogs were telling me that micros-tock photography was not going to make the average photography enthusiast rich. Mostly because there are tens of millions of images available and the photographers that are successful upload hundreds of high quality images to many sites. This was not going to discourage me so I started applying to the several sites I researched, Fotolio, IStock Photo, and Shutterstock.

I'm not going to write about each approval process or about the pro's and con's of each site. I made my decision on these sites because at the time they were the most popular and I felt these presented the best opportunity at selling my images. There are many micro-stock sites. It is best to do the research and choose one that is right for you.

Each site required a free registration and had me follow very similar processes where I had to submit images for approval. Only after the initial approvals would I be allowed to upload additional images for selling approval. Looking back, I believe these site were trying to weed out the serious photographers from the "snapshot" photographers. Fotolio and IStock required three images to be approved by their screeners, Shutterstock required ten. Each site was very critical about these initial images. I could tell the screeners looked at each image very closely. I spent my time giving each image a title, a description, categories, and most important and painful, I assigned the keywords. I thought I sent them the very best images I had, but most were rejected for reasons such as:

  • This file contains artifacting when viewed at full size.
  • ++Oversharpening. We found this file over filtered from its original appearance/quality.
  • We're sorry, but we did not find this file suitable as stock.
  • ++ logos on shoes. This file includes content that may be subject to copyright or trademark protection.

My visions of a tropical island home were dwindling fast. I took their recommendations and learned what the sites felt were acceptable images. Images accepted on Fotolio were not automatically accepted on IStock and IStock accepted images were not automatically accepted on Fotolio. I was never able to crack the Shutterstock acceptance code. I became discouraged with Shutterstock and gave up.

Once I got accepted on Fotolia and IStock Photo, I thought I would start seeing the money flow into my bank account within the next day or two. I informed my family by showing them the pictures, I got my congratulations, started envisioning the cool camera equipment I could buy, and I started thinking about when I could quit my job. I started checking the statistics at least twice a day. No sales! I had my first images accepted on August 12, 2007. On August 29, 2007, a little over two weeks since I was approved, I checked my images and I had my first sale. I sold my "Sawgrass Lake Office Park" image and earned a commission of $0.24! I was so excited I called my family together to tell them the good news. The only issue I had was where was I going to spend the money.

I have been submitting and selling microstock photography since August 2007. The great majority of my images are hosted by IStock Photo. Over the years, I have learned a lot about shooting stock photography images and how web and advertising designers use the images in there projects. My current IStock portfolio consists of the following:

  • Accepted Images: 58
  • Downloads: 202
  • Views: 9,332
  • Royalties: $180.87
  • Accepted Ration: 48%

I'm glad I didn't quit my job. The bloggers were correct, I was not going to get rich selling micro-stock photography. Those that I have made contact with that are making a living, have hundreds of high quality images uploaded to many micro-stock sites.

Shooting stock photography is an art that takes practice, patience, and a keen sense of understanding the subject matter that someone may be looking for. Stock photography isn't about shooting photographs you like, or shooting nature scenes, or shooting fantastic sunsets, or cute pictures of your children. Stock photography is about creating high quality images that graphics artists and designers can use and manipulate for web pages or printed advertising. People are purchasing these images to apply them to a specific advertising theme. Good stock photography are quality images that have space for graphic artists to add captions or display a predefined message, or render a portion of the image into their theme.

For me, photography is fun and exciting. Walking the beach, meeting new people, exploring city streets, looking for and capturing objects that most people ignore in their daily travels adds to the mystery and surprise of what can I find and photograph each day. I look at each day I shoot as an opportunity to experience a new adventure while practicing my photography. Uploading my images and having someone buy an image for $0.24 or $1.24 just makes photography a more exciting and fun.

These are a few of my most downloaded images:

 

 

 

 

 

To view my IStockPhoto portfolio click here:

If you are interested in seeing how designers manipulate stock images with Photoshop watch this IStockPhoto Battle Royale video finalist.

I hope your first $0.24 is or was as cool as mine.

Enjoy and remember,

"Moments in time are lived once. Images of those moments live forever."

Ed H.

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(Ed Hineline Jr) blog camera image journal micro-stock photo photography stock stock photography https://www.edhineline.com/blog/2012/2/microstock_photography Sun, 19 Feb 2012 00:45:41 GMT
Chronicles of a Photography Enthusiast https://www.edhineline.com/blog/2012/2/chronicles-of-a-photography-enthusiast An Enthusiast is "One who is filled with enthusiasm; one who is ardently absorbed in an interest or pursuit;" (Answer's.com). I consider myself a photography enthusiast.  I have been involved in photography for many years. From working in our family owned photo processing lab, to shooting events, to micro stock photography.  I've worked hard to learn and understand much of the technical and artistic fundamentals of photography.  I am passionate about my photography.  I always seem to have the camera wrapped around my wrist and backpack over my shoulder.

I'm going to chronicle my successes and failures in trying to succeed in this field of photography.  I am going to write about the emotions of applying to micro stock photography sites, what it felt like when I sold my first image, and the disappointment of having images rejected when I thought I shot a picture that would be sold.  I am going to write about my photo assignments, usually volunteer assignments, and the process of putting up my own photography website.  Most importantly, I am going to write about the joy I get from photography.  The exhilaration from positive comments on my work.  The enjoyment from attending events and meeting new people.  And the experience of finding new objects, people, and nature to photograph.  How frustration and rejection becomes totally null and void when I start shooting again or someone tells me "I really like that shot."

My chronicles will be current and past adventures documented from a "grassroots" perspective.  From a self proclaimed photography enthusiast not a professional.  It's my hope that I'll be able to connect with more people like myself that are interested in learning and have a true passion for photography.

This is exciting because "Moments in time are lived once. Images of those moments live forever."

Enjoy and remember,

"Moments in time are lived once. Images of those moments live forever."

Ed H.

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(Ed Hineline Jr) blog camera chronicles enthusiast image journal photo photography https://www.edhineline.com/blog/2012/2/chronicles-of-a-photography-enthusiast Sun, 19 Feb 2012 00:45:31 GMT